Floods Are Hard to Prevent – But Can Always Be Controlled!

 

Unsustainable urbanization (i.e. where cities are built all wrong) is the main reason behind the flash floods that have increasingly become common everywhere. Recent floods are not a singular event limited to any one region – they’re a widespread global phenomenon. While the developed countries have begun to realize the faults in their city planning methods and are attempting to fix it, most developing countries simply do not have the resources nor the time to possibly look into this – most of their cities are being rapidly urbanized, and often, with no plan whatsoever. Therefore, the flash floods we see today are mostly the result of our own careless actions, and are hard to prevent by this point (it’s not like we can remove whole cities and relocate them elsewhere, or take back all the land reclamation schemes. Maybe we could go back in time.).

Thus, what is best to do at present is to invest in flood control methods, and obviously, use much more sustainable city planning methods for the cities of tomorrow. Flood control methods can be basically introduced as two-fold – those permanent ones, and those set up during the emergency itself. It goes without saying that permanent methods are of course more expensive, but in the long run, they are more efficient at preventing flooding (since emergency methods don’t really prevent flooding, but attempt to limit the damage it has already caused).

Permanent methods are flood control methods permanently constructed prior to any possible flood alert. They include river embankments, dams and floodways. River embankments are simply artificial levees built out of concrete, which raise the banks of a river, thereby increasing the maximum capacity of a river. Whilst dams and their reservoirs are built for other purposes, they are also especially designed so as to serve as flood control measures. Dams ensure that water in the reservoir level, often prior to the rainy season, is below a certain level, so that allocations may be made for the extra water that rains bring about. Lastly, floodways, also known as diversion canals, are channels especially built to divert waters during flood times away from settlements.

Emergency methods are instead simple, quick methods employed during flood times to reduce the extent of the damage a flood may cause. The most common methods are sandbags and flood barriers. The former method is the one that is mostly used by developing countries, given that it is relatively inexpensive. As the name suggests, bags are filled with sand and stacked one above the other to create a wall against the flood waters. While in the past this was mostly done manually (and still is in some developing regions), nowadays a machine called a sand bagging machine is employed.

The sand bagging machine can fill the sandbags and even stack them, and therefore cuts down the time needed to erect the walls. The latter method, flood barriers, are mostly used by the developed countries. They consist of metal or glass barriers that support themselves using the weight of the flood waters itself, and can be easily removed once the waters recede (unlike sandbags). Get to know where you cam rent other industrial equipment right here http://paulls.com.au/.

Of course, there are many other methods employed in flood control, but at the end of the day, the situation won’t improve considerably unless extensive measures are employed by the governments to change the current city plans into more sustainable ones.